How to rhyme well (a guide)
How to rhyme well (a guide) poem stories
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A how-to guide on how create awesome, natural-sounding lines that rhyme.

How to rhyme well (a guide)

Rhyming is an awesome poetic technique, but it can be difficult to get right.

Rhyming is an awesome poetic technique, but it can be difficult to get right. I'm going to teach you how to rhyme well.

Rhyming is an awesome poetic technique, but it can be difficult to get right. I'm going to teach you how to rhyme well. It's going to be...

Rhyming is an awesome poetic technique, but it can be difficult to get right. I'm going to teach you how to rhyme well. It's going to be... Swell

In my personal view, good poetry involves writing something that:

In my personal view, good poetry involves writing something that: - Flows well and has a good rhythm.

In my personal view, good poetry involves writing something that: - Flows well and has a good rhythm. - Generates vivid imagery.

In my personal view, good poetry involves writing something that: - Flows well and has a good rhythm. - Generates vivid imagery. - Has an emotional impact on the reader.

Ideally, each line you write should contribute something to your poem:

Ideally, each line you write should contribute something to your poem: - It could enhance an image.

Ideally, each line you write should contribute something to your poem: - It could enhance an image. - Add meaning

Ideally, each line you write should contribute something to your poem: - It could enhance an image. - Add meaning - Or help develop a story.

Rhyming is an excellent way to help create flow and rhythm.

Rhyming is an excellent way to help create flow and rhythm. However, bad rhymes can really hurt a poem if they appear forced or contrived.

Rhyming is an excellent way to help create flow and rhythm. However, bad rhymes can really hurt a poem if they appear forced or contrived. This often occurs because a writer establishes a rhyme scheme, then writes themselves into a corner.

Perhaps the author writes one great line, but struggles to find something to rhyme with it.

Perhaps the author writes one great line, but struggles to find something to rhyme with it. They then feel forced to use the only word they can think of that rhymes with the first.

Perhaps the author writes one great line, but struggles to find something to rhyme with it. They then feel forced to use the only word they can think of that rhymes with the first. And maybe this is a bad rhyme or requires the author to write a meaningless, silly, or redundant line, just to get the rhyme in.

If the rhyme doesn't really work...

If the rhyme doesn't really work... Or

If the rhyme doesn't really work... Or If it's obvious the line doesn't add anything to the poem other than for the sake of rhyming...

If the rhyme doesn't really work... Or If it's obvious the line doesn't add anything to the poem other than for the sake of rhyming Or

If the rhyme doesn't really work... Or If it's obvious the line doesn't add anything to the poem other than for the sake of rhyming Or The line itself doesn't read very well...

...then the line is going to feel forced and unnatural.

Ideally, you want lines that rhyme well AND add depth, meaning, or imagery to your poem.

Ideally, you want lines that rhyme well AND add depth, meaning, or imagery to your poem. But this can be tricky if you can't think of rhyme that allows you to do that.

So what can you do?

In simple terms, you need to give yourself lots of options on the rhyme.

In simple terms, you need to give yourself lots of options on the rhyme. The more options you have, the more freedom you have to craft a line genuinely adds to the poem, rather than simply keeps the rhyme scheme going for its own sake.

It's all about OPTIONS

Technique 1:

Technique 1: (This is super simple)

Technique 1: (This is super simple) Use a rhyming dictionary.

Technique 1: (This is super simple) Use a rhyming dictionary. E.g. Rhyme Zone

Technique 1: (This is super simple) Use a rhyming dictionary. E.g. Rhyme Zone https://www.rhymezone.com/

Technique 1: (This is super simple) Use a rhyming dictionary. E.g. Rhyme Zone https://www.rhymezone.com/ Which is good and free

It will help you find rhymes that perhaps you hadn't thought of.

It will help you find rhymes that perhaps you hadn't thought of. And give you more options to craft a good line.

Technique 2:

Technique 2: Use a thesaurus.

Technique 2: Use a thesaurus. E.g.

Technique 2: Use a thesaurus. E.g. https://www.thesaurus.com/

Technique 2: Use a thesaurus. E.g. https://www.thesaurus.com/ Again, this is good and free.

If you're struggling to find a good rhyme for the word at the end of the first line, maybe you need to change that word!

If you're struggling to find a good rhyme for the word at the end of the first line, maybe you need to change that word! Never feel beholden to your first line. You are allowed to modify it!

Say your first line ends with the word "walk"

Say your first line ends with the word "walk" Using a thesaurus you can find alternatives like...

Say your first line ends with the word "walk" Using a thesaurus you can find alternatives like... "stroll", "traipse", "parade", "march" and a whole lot of other things.

Suddenly, you've got a lot more options, and you can run each of those words through the rhyming dictionary too.

Suddenly, you've got a lot more options, and you can run each of those words through the rhyming dictionary too. The more options you have, the more likely are to find something that allows you to craft a line that genuinely adds to your poem.

Technique 3:

Technique 3: Change the word order or simply re-write the line.

Technique 3: Change the word order or simply re-write the line. There are usually lots of ways you can write a line that means the same thing.

For example:

For example: "My cat is what I love the most"

For example: "My cat is what I love the most" Could be reordered as...

For example: "My cat is what I love the most" Could be reordered as... "What I love the most, is my cat"

For example: "My cat is what I love the most" Could be reordered as... "What I love the most, is my cat" Or rewritten as...

For example: "My cat is what I love the most" Could be reordered as... "What I love the most, is my cat" Or rewritten as... "I love my cat above all else"

Each time you change the order or the phrasing, you've got more options.

Technique 4:

Technique 4: Use metaphor or simile.

Technique 4: Use metaphor or simile. (A metaphor is where you say something IS something else, a simile is where you say it is LIKE IT IS something else)

Say if your first line was...

Say if your first line was... "The field was coated in snow"

Say if your first line was... "The field was coated in snow" Could be...

Say if your first line was... "The field was coated in snow" Could be... "The field was a cold, white blanket"

Say if your first line was... "The field was coated in snow" Could be... "The field was a cold, white blanket" Or...

Say if your first line was... "The field was coated in snow" Could be... "The field was a cold, white blanket" Or... "It was as if the field was dusted in icing"

Each one of these gives you more options.

Each one of these gives you more options. And again you can use the rhyming dictionary, thesaurus, and re-writing/re-ordering techniques.

It's all about...

It's all about... Options

It's all about... Options Options

It's all about... Options Options OPTIONS

With all this together, you should be able to craft two (or more) lines that rhyme and that really add something to your poem.

If the words rhyme well, and the lines add something to your poem, they will sound great and feel natural to the reader.

And then everyone will be happy :)

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