Getting those feelings out may even make it easier to finally talk to someone, friend, family, therapist, anyone about the struggle of depression.
Writing to Combat Depression depression stories
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odie_423
odie_423 Community member
Autoplay OFF   •   6 months ago
EXPRESSION VS DEPRESSION: Depression affects the lives of millions across the globe. Pharmaceutical companies, it seems, come out with a new pill to treat depression every few months.

Getting those feelings out may even make it easier to finally talk to someone, friend, family, therapist, anyone about the struggle of depression.

Writing to Combat Depression

EXPRESSION VS DEPRESSION:

Depression affects the lives of millions across the globe. Pharmaceutical companies, it seems, come out with a new pill to treat depression every few months.

The side effects of which often cause more harm physically and can even lead those taking them to become even more depressed than when they started treatment.

Finding a creative outlet, in my experience, can have a much more positive affect on depression, with absolutely no physical side effects.

Writing, in its many forms, has been the most beneficial creative outlet for me.

I started with poetry, nothing extravagant,

my first poem was actually a diamante (a diamond shaped poem that starts with a single word and ends with a single word that is the formers antithesis).

The poem was quite terrible, I'm sure, but I noticed that the buildup of emotion that I couldn't' verbalize to my friends or family would dissipate as I wrote.

It did not take long, however, until the zombie like feeling I had from the Prozac made me feel like I didn't have any more words to put down.

With a good bit of angst building from the writer's block, I tried free writing. I would start by copying several lines from a book, poem, song lyrics, or even a quote from a movie.

The sound of the pen cutting across the paper for even just a few moments would generally be enough to get my own words flowing.

As the words would start to spill onto the paper, I would start to feel better, lighter.

I started writing so often, there were notebooks and loose papers piled everywhere; my room had them strewn all about; my car was littered; my school locker had more than twelve inside itself.

As it became easier to write, I started to make it more poignant, more focused on why I was feeling like I did.

I talked to my therapist who had become so satisfied with the progress I was making, I was able to wean my dosage of antidepressants down. I started to journal.

I would put even the most mundane of details about my day, but in doing so,

I was able to literally point out the parts of the day that would have put me into a downward spiral before I started writing.

I became more aware of others as well. I started to notice some of my symptoms in one of my best friends, Mike.

Mike was always the class clown, but I noticed the changes in his eyes, the sad expressions on his face while everyone else was too busy laughing at his jokes.

I approached him with a few of my journal entries and a blank notebook. Mike was

most decidedly not a "book smart" fellow, but sharing with him my struggle to get started, seemed to bolster his confidence some.

A few months later, Mike bear hugged me in the hall between classes. He told me writing was becoming part of his daily routine, he had even shared some of his writings with his mom.

The entries he shared with his mom were the first communications he had given her that there was something going on with him. Mike had started to get his gleam back into his eyes.

As Mike started to return to his old self, I started to become my new self; that is, anti-depressant free. My smile became genuine again, my laughter true.

This is not to say that I didn't and don't still struggle with episodes of sadness and melancholy, we all do.

I now have a better understanding of them and the best tool in my arsenal to combat them and express the feelings without letting them take me back down the rabbit hole: writing.

For some people struggling with depression, the pharmaceutical approach can and does help. There are many of us, however, where the effect is contrary.

Being able to find that creative outlet, a way to get the feelings out that you can't seem to ever be able to verbalize, is a much safer and healthier option.

The risks to mind and body from the drug companies' treatments versus the virtually nonexistent side effects of creation and expression, for me at least,

The risks to mind and body from the drug companies' treatments versus the virtually nonexistent side effects of creation and expression, for me at least,

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