URBI ET ORBI
URBI ET ORBI physics stories
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candyblue
candybluepostmodernaliencat.
Autoplay OFF  •  9 months ago
I don't mean to interrupt your scrolling, but I have got a few questions for you.

URBI ET ORBI

Have I caught you before your finger slipped too far up your screen, up your track-pad, scroll wheel? Am I interrupting something with my questions?

Breaking into whatever you were thinking before you clicked on this? I do apologise. It's just that I was curious.

world World the world What do you think when this word (world?) approaches you?

<ring> <ring/> You roll your eyes and look at your phone. The world is calling. Dimming out with its letters that vague part of your otherwise white screen which, in a Fibonacci sequence, would float about in the thirteen section.

'Thirteen what, though?' you're probably asking. Shifting about, crossing and uncrossing your legs. You may have even just let out a grunt thinking 'Do I really want to read this right now? Do I want to have my thoughts dictated to me- my actions, even?'

This is your chance, dear reader, to make your escape: drop your phone, hit the beloved 'ctrl + t' buttons and transport yourself some place else. Make some tea, perhaps, or dinner? Do you consider them one and the same? In that case, again, I owe you my apologies.

Click

Click Tap

Click Tap Click

Tap Click Tap Click

Tap Click Tap Click Tap

Still here? Good. The world is waiting for you. Do you deserve to be waited for, though? Waited on, even, by this grand spinning globe that harvests all known life. What if, however, we consider this omnipotent sphere in the words of Carl Sagan:

'pale blue dot' .

The spectacle of this so-called world zooms out in our minds from a large spinning orb, the kind you'd find in old libraries, to a marble, floating in the negative space of dark matter.

What now, you might ask.

Again, I see you questioning why, at this time of night, when all you wanted to do was flick through your series and scroll through your online feeds, you are here, eyes still squinting at the excessive lengthiness of these sentences.

One might have considered the word 'longitude' to stick to the theme. But that would involve reading left to right, a technique not adapted by the English language.

Perhaps we should consider changing language, then? At this point, you might agree, we are too far in.

<ring> <ring/> <ring> <ring/>

You answer your phone.

I leave you.

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