The mind melting reason Schrödinger's "What is Life" made my mind melt: in five logical steps
The mind melting reason Schrödinger's "What is Life" made my mind melt: in five logical steps stories
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jbooboo
jboobooCommunity member
Autoplay OFF  •  2 years ago
I told a friend that "What is Life?" by Schrödinger was one of the best books I've read recently and was asked why. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to provide a well articulated explanation at the time, but I promised him I would later. So...

The mind melting reason Schrödinger's "What is Life" made my mind melt: in five logical steps

by jbooboo

First two warm ups to get you in the mood

(also from the book)

Warm up: we can't see in three dimensions

We know there are three dimensions, but we see in two dimensions. We *experience* the third with our other senses.

Warm up: we don't look at people - we absorb their light

Eyes are windows. We use phrases like "he looked at her", but really we should be saying, he pointed his two bottomless light holes at her and absorbed her aura.

Okay, showtime

1. Time doesn't exist.

Time is a helpful way to organize cause and effect, but without 'events' time would not exist on its own.

2. Lots of things don't "exist"

Ex: Evolution doesn't exist but it is still real. You can't point at any step and say 'evolution!' Same with colors & consciousness. They're not point-at-able.

3. You technically don't exist

Sorry :( There is no piece of you that you can point at and say 'that is me!' You're a bunch of cells working in harmony. It's the way those cells work together that puts the 'I' in you.

4. Processes aren't victim to the same end as matter

"Change is the only constant." If it never existed in the first place, it can't cease to be. Evolution never stops. It can't "break" or "wear out".

5. The "process" of you could be immortal

If we figured out the steps in our process, we could replace worn out parts, or even switch mediums entirely, and forever retain our 'I'.

#newGoals

it's a great book. thanks Schrodinger

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