Panic Attacks. No.1
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dissonanceAnd everything in you is a dream
Autoplay OFF  •  10 months ago
Panic attacks in public are petrifying.

Panic Attacks. No.1

by dissonance

Mother wait. Hold me, I can't stand

I can't breathe.

Hold on, just give me a minute. I'll soon be able to hide it and function like you.

WAIT. My mind is too heavy and dizzy, I can't see.

Heart stay strong. . . Lungs don't you dare stop breathing now, you take in that breath of air!

It's too much....

Stop the car, one minute please. I can't breath.

Tears please don't slip out now, I've held you in for far too long.

Mom wait, I just need a minute. I can do this.

Yes I can. Come on body, stop with all of this heaviness and shakiness

It's all in your head. It's all in there. . . .

Hold on, is it too hot in here or is it just me? I'm sweating pools, it can't just be me..?

Just let me hold my arms down, they're shaking too much.

That's wired..what is happening to me?

Am I dying? No that can't be. . .

Hold on just give me a minute I can do this.

World hold on, just stop the car for a minute

I can't breathe. Don't you understand, just wait!

Please just hold on, let me hide it. I can function like you.

I can pretend, just give me a minute.

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dissonanceAnd everything in you is a dream
10 months agoReply
@bernardtwindwil Ahh, I understand now what you are trying to get across. And I do agree with you on how the word "panic" is being misplaced in some situations. Thank you again for your comments and its reassuring to know I was able to convey it correctly.

wethedreamersAnd we're a million miles away.
10 months agoReply
You swung and way hit too close to home. Yikes. In the best way possible.

bernardtwindwilGranddad & story teller, tomthepo8.com
10 months agoReply
@dissonance "Panic disorder" is part of the problem. I have polymyositis. No one calls it "sissy muscle weakness" the word panic is a negative pejorative. We make negative comments on someone's excitability by saying "Don't panic, bro." There are a number of disorders that are not prefaced by a pejorative. Panic is not a term used in best practices as an objective descriptor. I just hate seeing the term "panic" being tacked on to people when it is not panic. You did convey the intrinsic feelings connected to the event. You could not have dione a better job in my opinion. I don't really have a right to open my mouth as I don't have the disorder.

dissonanceAnd everything in you is a dream
10 months agoReply
@bernardtwindwil I do apologize, but I am quite confused on what you are trying to get across. Are you asking us to change the terminology we are using which is "panic attack." The diagnosis itself is called a "Panic Disorder" so it is only appropriate to use "panic attack" for its major symptom, which is its medical term. I am not trying to talk deeply about the chemical and biological part of the attack and disorder itself, I was trying to convey the physical aspects.

riverfr0zenwriter, programmer, photographer?
10 months agoReply
Oh, I've certainly been here. Well put together, this piece.

bernardtwindwilGranddad & story teller, tomthepo8.com
10 months agoReply
@limerence @adamcerny @cjhale @dissonance I am not likely to have any direct influence on the vernacular of today's inaccurate and unfortunate descriptors who use the term "panic attack". But perhaps I can enlist y'all. Norepinephrine overload is a better descriptor. But not likely to take hold. Maybe pixie dust overload or Kum-Ji syndrome. They are no more nonsense than calling the malady "panic attack". Change the wording of the conversation.

dissonanceAnd everything in you is a dream
10 months agoReply
@bernardtwindwil You're right. It's something that an individual has no say or control over. Like you said, their lifestyle and their diet don't play as major factors that create or avoid panic attacks. Sadly, society doesn't do a good enough job in trying to understand this. When someone has a panic attack in public, people around that individual start to throw assumptions that the individual might have drank too much coffee, not enough sleep, unhealthy, and even the assumption that their blood pressure has dropped. However, it doesn't get any better when they explain to them that it was a panic attack because in return the hear awful comments thrown back at them. "Well, there wasn't even a lot of people there?" "You need to grow up and be strong." Or " don't think too much about it." It makes that individual feel weak, sad, and ashamed for having something they can't even control. But not enough people seem to understand this or are willing enough to provide support.

adamcernySocial Media Guru + Performer
10 months agoReply
This is so beautifully accurate. :)

erofaerHow can I be impressive in one sentence?
10 months agoReply
Thank you for writing this.

bernardtwindwilGranddad & story teller, tomthepo8.com
10 months agoReply
I am happy that this has been seen by so many of our fellow campers here at Camp Commaful. This is something that is an organic chemical imbalance which the sufferer has not caused because of anything. Your body just fails to produce the neurotransmitters in the proper ratios. Norepinephrine is related to anxiety as it involves the fight-or-flight response, or how a person reacts to stress. GABA plays a role in balancing excitement or agitation and feelings of calm and relaxation. These changes are not brought about by too much caffeine nor your lifestyle. They are completely outside the control of the person. As such panic attacks should in no case be the cause of any derision.