Police Officers don't target minority neighborhoods but rather are drawn there by the high crime rate, which is likely related to socioeconomic status.
 Police Officers don't target minority neighborhoods but rather are drawn there by the high crime rate, which is likely related to socioeconomic status. stories
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Edit: I'd like to define "target" as intentionally patrol, cite, harass, or arrest minorities simply because they are minorities, with no other rationale behind it. First things first, I'm a brown Hispanic who has lived in a poor,
By Oh_itbDio https://www.reddit.com/r/...

Police Officers don't target minority neighborhoods but rather are drawn there by the high crime rate, which is likely related to socioeconomic status.

by Oh_itbDio

Edit: I'd like to define "target" as intentionally patrol, cite, harass, or arrest minorities simply because they are minorities, with no other rationale behind it.

First things first, I'm a brown Hispanic who has lived in a poor,

pre-dominantly Hispanic neighborhood for a good portion of my childhood (0-9)with the other half spent living in a working-middle class racially diverse neighborhood(9-18).

The immediate area surrounding that second neighborhood is full of poor, majority white neighborhoods who were heavily policed due to the amount of drugs entering/leaving their neighborhoods.

I don't believe the police target minorities but rather are drawn there due to the high amount of crime. In fact, I believe the actual issue that creates crime is poverty.

Since minorities are disproportionately represented in poverty levels, they are also disproportionately represented in crime rates, which leads to heavier policing.

My reasoning:

1. The impoverished in the area where I truly grew up were poor, rural whites.

Witnessing the heavy policing of their neighborhoods lead me to believe that police either a) target the poor or b) poor people commit more crimes, leading to more patrols.

2. I've worked for the police in the next town over, which was majority black. I was a dispatcher and handled emergency calls.

The overwhelming majority of violent calls came from the poorest areas, which also happened to be majority black.

Having worked there, I understood it wasn't standard procedure to "police the blacks," but most our calls came from the same (poor) neighborhoods, which leads to more patrols,

which leads to more interactions with the police.

3. Growing up brown myself in the South, I have never once felt profiled, harassed, or discriminated against because of my skin color.

In fact, the majority of my interactions with (white) police officers (even when I was caught with weed...twice) have been civil and led to no arrest.

Even when getting pulled over for speeding, I have never been issued a ticket. That being said, I am incredibly respectful to police officers every time I interact with them.

I've been told I live in a bubble and have no idea how bad racism is in this country.

Perhaps my perception is skewed because the poor people on my side of town were white?

Some things that might change my mind are evidence of any sort that police target minorities, evidence that shows even wealthy minority neighborhoods are targeted by police,

or evidence that shows that patrolling of minority neighborhoods aren't related to high crime rates.

Anecdotes may be considered as well, assuming there's no other rational explanation for the interaction.

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